Everyday Life

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Growing up with type 1 diabetes, my doctor always stressed the importance of planning ahead if I wanted to have a child.

When I first discovered that I was pregnant, I was flooded with emotions—like any first-time parent-to-be. Excitement, joy, and a twinge of worry all blended together.

Well, hello everyone! I want to start off by introducing myself and telling you about how I found out my pancreas was a little lazier than the average person's. More specifically, how I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D). It’s probably a good idea to start with my name.

We are in a new era of sick.

COVID-19 has altered the way we look at being under the weather and how we approach sickness.

In fact, it has changed and continues to change the way we do almost everything.

The holiday season can serve as a time to establish tradition and reaffirm relationships. It can also be a time of high stress and emotion. When living with a chronic condition like type 1 diabetes, the season also arrives bearing gifts of a challenging nature. 

The summer of 2022 emerged like a tour de force to lead us out of the cold, dark, and pandemic-filled winter of 2021. And as restrictions lifted around the globe, things shifted.

I remember waiting in the school office. I sat there with my underwear secretly stuffed with toilet paper to hide the evidence. My dad was on his way.

It was towards the end of my grade 8 year.

As far as I knew, I was the last girl in our grade to get my period.

This year, I challenge you to take a really honest look at how you think about yourself and your diabetes.

Sex is anything but simple. 

Especially when you have type 1 diabetes.

In fact, it can sometimes feel as though there is someone else there between you and your partner. Like shared headspace: your partner is thinking “let’s get it on” but you may be more “what could go wrong?”

When I was a teenager, my diabetes team at the hospital often showed me insulin pumps. I could barely stand looking at them and would immediately decline wearing one. For me, it was like walking around with a sign saying: LOOK AT ME I HAVE DIABETES!

Parenthood presents a unique set of challenges when you live with a chronic condition like type 1 diabetes. But those situations offer equally unique opportunities to teach your children about patience, compassion, and understanding.